airline survey

Passengers Prefer Self-Service to People

Passengers Want Self-Service

Air Passengers Want Self-Service

A new survey indicates that air passengers prefer the self-service options offered through technology over completing the same tasks via airline employees. In fact, 55% of passengers reported using some self-service tech for air travel. According to the “2016 SITA Passenger IT Trends Survey” published on May 28, 2016, airline passengers are now so comfortable with technology – especially their own mobile devices – that airlines and airports must offer passengers both choice as well as control.

Tech + Self-Service = Satisfaction

The survey found that passengers are happiest during the steps in the air travel process which permit the most choice and self-control. For example, at booking, which can be done via PC, mobile, or an agent, 93% of passengers report a positive experience. At the opposite end of the spectrum, passengers reported the most negative emotions are experienced during security screening, which permit the least amount of choice and self-control. [···]

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Survey on Airline Seat Swaps

Seat Swaps

Crowded Flights

Airline seat swaps occur regularly during commercial air travel. Air travelers are willing to pay or be paid to swap seats with other travelers, according to survey results released today. Air travelers sitting in a less desirable seat are willing to pay other travelers to swap for a more desirable seat. Similarly, in return for receiving payment, air travelers are willing to swap from a more desirable seat to a less desirable seat.

Airline Seat Swaps: Survey Overview

Presented below is an overview of the survey on airline seat swaps.

Survey Respondents

Seateroo hired SurveyMonkey to survey U.S. residents aged 18 to 65 years old who are mobile device users and had traveled via commercial airline at least 3 times during the previous 6 months. SurveyMonkey gathered responses from 401 respondents meeting the above criteria during the week of November 15-19, 2015. The margin for error based upon this sample size is +/- 5%.

Survey Design

Based upon prior studies related to air traveler preferences and complaints, we made certain underlying assumptions regarding the types of airline seats and situations that air travelers consider to be either more desirable or less desirable, respectively. Specifically, the airline seat swaps survey included the following assumptions:

  • Aisle and window seats are more desirable than middle seats;
  • Seats closer to the front are more desirable than seats towards the back;
  • Seats closer to family, friends, or colleagues are more desirable than seats next to strangers;
  • Seats in a premium seating section (i.e., business or first class) are more desirable than economy seats; and
  • Seats near quiet passengers are more desirable than seats near crying children, loud talkers, or other potentially annoying air travelers.

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Passenger Behavior: Top 10 Complaints

Crying children. Smelly adults. Loud passengers. Have you flown recently via commercial air travel? If so, then perhaps you understand the frustration of dealing with unpleasant airline passenger behavior. Spending several hundred dollars for the right to spend several hours in a cramped airplane cabin can make aggravating airline passenger behavior even more irritating.

What was your worst experience with poor airline passenger behavior? Review the study below to see if your experience hit the top 10 list of aggravating airline passenger behavior.

Passenger Behavior Study

In 2014, Expedia published an “Airplane Etiquette Study” that revealed the top 10 list of aggravating airline passenger behavior. In addition, the study indicated the frequency in which each behavior was cited by study respondents. Below is a summary listing of the most aggravating airline passenger behavior and the corresponding frequency each was cited by study respondents.[1] [···]

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