Surveys

Seateroo User Survey

Market for sale listing - cabin

Seateroo conducted a survey of registered Seateroo users to obtain valuable feedback related to key metrics associated with airline seat swaps. Unlike our passenger survey conducted with the help of SurveyMonkey in 2015, this survey was solely sent to Seateroo users rather than general air travelers. If you are interested in the 2015 survey results of 401 frequent air travelers, then you can read about it here.

Survey Results

Our survey results was based upon 130 responses from Seateroo registered users.

How many flights do you fly annually?

The maximum number of flights flown annually was estimated to be 160. The average for all respondents was 26 flights annually with a median of 18 flights annually.

Would you be more likely to swap seats using an airline-branded seat swap app?

89% of respondents indicated “yes”.

If you were unhappy with the location of your ECONOMY seat, then what is the MAXIMUM amount you would be willing to pay to swap for a better ECONOMY seat?

The price varied based upon the length of the flight. In addition, there was a wide-range of prices offered among respondents for a particular length of flight. For flights of 5 hours or more, the average price was approximately $50. However, approximately 20% of respondents indicated a willingness to pay $81 to $100.

If you were unhappy with the location of your ECONOMY seat, then what is the MAXIMUM amount you would be willing to pay another passenger to swap for a better BUSINESS CLASS or FIRST CLASS seat?

The price varied based upon the length of the flight. For flights of 5 hours or more, the average price was approximately $75. However, approximately 53% of respondents indicated a willingness to pay $81 to $100. We did not ask about prices greater than $100, but if given the choice to do so, presumably a significant percentage of respondents would indicate a willingness to pay a price greater than $100.

How frequently are you UNHAPPY with your seat location or who you are sitting next to?

Based upon the 130 respondents included in our survey, respondents estimated that they were unhappy on over 30% of their flights. [···]

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Passengers Prefer Self-Service to People

Passengers Want Self-Service

Air Passengers Want Self-Service

A new survey indicates that air passengers prefer the self-service options offered through technology over completing the same tasks via airline employees. In fact, 55% of passengers reported using some self-service tech for air travel. According to the “2016 SITA Passenger IT Trends Survey” published on May 28, 2016, airline passengers are now so comfortable with technology – especially their own mobile devices – that airlines and airports must offer passengers both choice as well as control.

Tech + Self-Service = Satisfaction

The survey found that passengers are happiest during the steps in the air travel process which permit the most choice and self-control. For example, at booking, which can be done via PC, mobile, or an agent, 93% of passengers report a positive experience. At the opposite end of the spectrum, passengers reported the most negative emotions are experienced during security screening, which permit the least amount of choice and self-control. [···]

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Survey on Airline Seat Swaps

Seat Swaps

Crowded Flights

Airline seat swaps occur regularly during commercial air travel. Air travelers are willing to pay or be paid to swap seats with other travelers, according to survey results released today. Air travelers sitting in a less desirable seat are willing to pay other travelers to swap for a more desirable seat. Similarly, in return for receiving payment, air travelers are willing to swap from a more desirable seat to a less desirable seat.

Airline Seat Swaps: Survey Overview

Presented below is an overview of the survey on airline seat swaps.

Survey Respondents

Seateroo hired SurveyMonkey to survey U.S. residents aged 18 to 65 years old who are mobile device users and had traveled via commercial airline at least 3 times during the previous 6 months. SurveyMonkey gathered responses from 401 respondents meeting the above criteria during the week of November 15-19, 2015. The margin for error based upon this sample size is +/- 5%.

Survey Design

Based upon prior studies related to air traveler preferences and complaints, we made certain underlying assumptions regarding the types of airline seats and situations that air travelers consider to be either more desirable or less desirable, respectively. Specifically, the airline seat swaps survey included the following assumptions:

  • Aisle and window seats are more desirable than middle seats;
  • Seats closer to the front are more desirable than seats towards the back;
  • Seats closer to family, friends, or colleagues are more desirable than seats next to strangers;
  • Seats in a premium seating section (i.e., business or first class) are more desirable than economy seats; and
  • Seats near quiet passengers are more desirable than seats near crying children, loud talkers, or other potentially annoying air travelers.

 [···]

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Airplane Etiquette 2015 Study

Rear seat-kickers are the most annoying passengers in America, according to an Expedia study published on November 10, 2015.

Seat-Kicker

Seat-Kicker

Airplane Etiquette Study

Expedia’s airplane etiquette survey was based upon questions posed to 1,000 U.S. adults during August 2015. Expedia previously conducted a similar study during 2014. In addition to generating a list of the top complaints related to air passenger behavior, the study also revealed the actions taken (and not taken) by passengers in reaction to annoying passenger behavior. Lastly, the study provided insight into air passengers preferred level of interaction with fellow passengers.

Most Annoying Air Passenger Behavior

For the second year in a row, rear seat-kicker ranked as the most annoying air passenger behavior. The annoying behaviors were ranked in terms of the frequency of being named by the survey respondents. Below is the list of annoying behaviors and frequency the behavior was mentioned in the survey. [···]

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The Sharing Economy and Air Travel

The sharing economy has brought significant changes to the travel industry. Travelers are increasingly comfortable with the convenience and value offered by sharing economy companies for ridesharing (Uber, Lyft, RelayRides, GetAround) and lodging (Airbnb, CouchSurfing, OneFineStay).

Among business travelers, a recent survey indicated that 44% used sharing economy options for lodging while 66% used sharing economy options for ground transportation.

Bringing the Sharing Economy to Air Travel

Seateroo is bringing the sharing economy to air travel. Through the Seateroo App, air travelers will be able to access preferred seats by paying other passengers to swap seats.

 [···]

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Reclining Airline Seats and You

Reclining Airline Seats
Reclining Airline Seats

Passengers flying economy are faced with smaller seats with less space between seats (called seat pitch). In this cabin environment, reclining airline seats significantly can greatly reduce the space for the passenger sitting behind the reclining passenger.  A survey of international flight attendants indicated that over 60% had been involved in, or witness to, an argument between passengers on the subject of reclined seats. Is the end near for reclining airline seats?

Opinions on Seat Reclining

There are passengers that are pro- and anti-seat reclining. For the pro-reclining passengers, the rationale is fairly simple: the airlines offer reclining seats and anyone can choose to recline or not to recline as desired. In addition, particularly on longer flights, some passengers indicate that a reclining airline seat is the difference between being able to sleep and staying awake.

The anti-reclining passengers point out that the ability to recline should not outweigh the fact that the airlines have significantly reduced the pitch between seats, especially in the economy section. In addition, for taller passengers and/or passengers working on laptops, they have a right to be comfortable which is not guaranteed by also electing to recline their seats. [···]

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Middle Seats: Study Reveals People Hate Them

Middle Seats

3M Study on Middle Seats

Common sense dictates that air passengers do not like to sit in middle seats. A study by commercial products behemoth 3M proves it!

Study on Middle Seats

With the help of Global Strategy Group, the 3M study highlighted the degree U.S. air passengers disliked sitting in a middle seat. The study revealed that 1% of passengers preferred to sit in a middle seat. Survey results included the following:

  • 56% would rather be stuck in traffic than sit in a middle seat;
  • 56% would rather go on a blind date than sit in a middle seat;
  • 50% would rather take an aisle seat being offered on the next available flight rather than sit in a middle seat;
  • 20% would stay overnight at an airport hotel for an aisle seat on the first flight the next morning rather than sit in a middle seat; and
  • 9% would simply refuse to sit in a middle seat on a flight longer than two hours.

 [···]

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Air Travel Complaints: The Top 5

air travel complaints

Crying child on airplane

Air travel can be stressful! Given the cost of airline tickets and the time spent in airports and airplanes,  consumers can be quite frustrated by factors that negatively impact the air travel experience. Unfortunately, air travel complaints are a common. Below is a summary of the results from a survey related to air travel complaints, including the top five air travel complaints.

Survey on Air Travel Complaints

Based upon a 2014 TripAdvisor survey of air passengers, the top five air travel complaints were revealed. In addition, the survey indicated the percentage of air passengers who selected the complaint during the survey.[1] [···]

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Mobile Device Use and Air Travel

Smartphone, Mobile Device

Smartphone for travel

Mobile devices, which include smartphones, tablets, and wearable devices, have become a must have accessory during the 21st century. As mobile device ownership has expanded, so has the perceived importance of mobile devices to air passengers before and during travel. Studies related to mobile device usage demonstrate the frequency of mobile device usage related to air travel.

Mobile Device Usage Surveys

Mobile device usage habits have been the subject of multiple surveys. Below is a summary of key statistics on air travelers’ behavior and opinions from studies published by Google[1], Amadeus[2], and TripAdvisor[3], respectively. [···]

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